The joy of watching a master

Today was not a typical day at nbss. Phil Lowe came and gave a 2 hour PowerPoint demo of the history of his work with over 200 hundred personal photos of his work and processes over the years. The scary part is that was the the latter of the 2 most exciting things today. Phil brought along a French master upholsterer with 50 years under his belt and he upholstered a Sheraton style aide chair made by a student. We watched him work for over 4 hours. Hi skill, speed and calm were incredible. He used 100% traditional methods with things such as pure horse hair for stuffing and a layer of pure Cotten. He was incredibly past, using his magnetic tipped brass tack hammers to pull tacks that he stores in his mouth from his lips. A one handed hammering operation allowing him to work the fabric with his other hand. On top of his mastery and ease to watch he was the sweetest and kindest man you could ever meet.
Phils presentation was wonderful as well, showing all his different projects and the type of different work that e does. He showed us some masterfull carvings he has done and they wowed me. He as well is a very kind and humorous man who love to give you encouragment and inspire you. He said to me and another class mate the most true words you could say “just keep on building”.
I did well today also, flattened a second board and got it at 7/8s. Needless to say I am happy with that result. Time will tell overnight if it stays flat! Please….there has to be a mountain of questions so please. Fire away! Get in contact with me on twitter to! Supercoopman

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  1. #1 by Sara Quentin on February 23, 2012 - 2:16 am

    Been following your short process and wish you all the luck. How long do you spend at school each day and is the shop open to you to use in off hours? What is the class size?

    • #2 by eatnbss on February 23, 2012 - 9:59 am

      Sara,
      My personal class is 11 students. There are 4 separate classes basically for each simester and I BELIEVE they are also 11 students. As for class it is supposed to be from 8 to 3 and that’s when the teachers are there however we can work early and late. I am usually there from 7 to 5 . I am sure it will get later once I move to Boston and then start building pieces. The shop is open for use after class times as long as others are around and the instructors have an idea what we will be doing.

      • #3 by Sara Quentin on February 23, 2012 - 5:29 pm

        Thanks! I’ll be back with more questions.

  2. #4 by Kenn on February 23, 2012 - 4:12 am

    Keep posting! I am in awe of the school and your oppotunity, following every post and a little envious of your experience in Boston. thanks so much for sharing.

  3. #5 by Sara Quentin on February 24, 2012 - 12:29 am

    I understand and applaud the drafting classes, my father was a draftsman and by looking over his shoulder I am pretty proficient at it…well, ok I know my way around it a bit. I know CAD as well but does the school only teach the pencil and paper approach or are they also going to introduce computer drawing to you as well?
    Sara

    • #6 by eatnbss on February 24, 2012 - 1:07 am

      They only teach pencil and paper. In a way I wish we did it on the computer because I am a horrible draftsman and the computer would clean my lines up and make my mistakes more easily fixed but pencil and paper does tend to more practical and traditional and allows one to easily freehand curves. In I guess my messyness is my personal expression. I just naturally don’t have immaculate paper and impeccable lines but I don’t know. I have been overly hard on myself about my drafting which isn’t the best because I had never touched a drafting tool in my life. Also Todd, my name is Evan.

  4. #7 by Todd on February 24, 2012 - 12:36 am

    Whats your first name?

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